Probation Violation

Boca Raton Criminal Defense Attorney

Everyday people don’t have to concern themselves with the finer points of the law as much as parolees and people on probation do. Probation is a time of intense scrutiny and evaluation, a test of how you conduct yourself among society. The courts are watching you for because they want to know: are you a law-disregarding or a law-abiding citizen?

If you’re on probation for a conviction in the State of Florida, it is imperative that you have a full knowledge of the regulations, laws and statutes the affect your status, and the consequences for violating the rules. There’s little to no room for error here; your fate depends on it.

What is Probation? 
Probation is a legal condition that allows you to avoid prison but still be closely monitored by probation officials, who will ensure you don’t do anything illegal. People on probation must report to their probation officer on a regular basis. People convicted of a crime may be sentenced to probation or put on probation as a condition of release from prison.

What is Parole?
The reason probation and parole aren’t interchangeable is pretty simple; if you’re convicted of a crime, you obviously can’t be sentenced to parole. In the State of Florida, parole is also referred to as Controlled Release, and it happens when an inmate obtains release from jail or prison. Several of the probation regulations apply to parolees; for a while after your release, you will be required to meet with your parole officer on a regular basis.

What Happens if I Violate my Probation or the Terms of my Parole?
For both, the likely consequence is you will go back to jail. If you were released from prison but you violated your parole, you may be incarcerated again until you serve the remainder of your sentence.

Common Parole Violations
There are several ways to violate probation or parole, including, but not limited to:

  • possession of a firearm
  • possession of illegal substances
  • failure to pass drug or alcohol testing
  • failure to report to your parole or probation officer
  • failure to pay fines or restitution
  • arrests for additional crimes
  • unauthorized travel or relocation
  • failure to comply with rehabilitation programs, community service, or other court-ordered programs
  • tampering with monitoring devices

If you wish to retain your freedom, it is absolutely crucial that you maintain a good relationship with the Florida Department of Corrections on as many levels as possible.

I Violated my Probation. Can a Florida Defense Attorney Help Me? 
South Florida defense attorney Charles Mead has helped many clients avoid lengthy sentences by working with them to craft a powerful, personalized, an ultimately beneficial defense strategy. If you violated your probation, he can help you mitigate the damage and possibly retain your freedom.

Are you facing charges for violating your probation or the terms of your parole or community control? If you don’t want to stay in jail any longer than you have to, please call Boca Raton lawyer Charlie Mead  at (561) 362-6677 in Boca Raton, (561) 366-9565 in West Palm Beach, or (954) 493-7474 in Fort Lauderdale.

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